Red Pigmented Watercolour Paints

Publié le par Désiré Herman

After my study of yellow pigments, here are the red pigments.

Ah, this red, bright, hot, vibrant, exciting and so special ... a sign of danger and passion, rare in pure hue in nature, yes the flowers show us these notes ...

Sennelier Red Watercolour Paints
Sennelier Red Watercolour Paints

It's true that red is not a primary shade, because it can be created. Indeed, the red is obtained by mixing yellow with magenta ...

I created a preview of what can be mixed. I used 7 yellow pigmented mono with 4 magentas naturally mono pigmented too. I did not add blue, but by doing that we get closer to the colours like the lacquer of madder to see dark perylenes.

Watercolour Mixing Reds with Magentas and 7 different mono pigment Yellows
Watercolour Mixing Reds with Magentas and 7 different mono pigment Yellows

So you can see that in most cases we can deprive ourselves of red in his palette. But in this case you need at least one magenta.

Flower or portrait painters may need specific red tints. But on average a hot red type vermillion or more neutral like the red of quinacridone or the red of pyrrole by adding a cold red red crimson style of alizarin or of the lacquer of madder (Attention, use the paintings resistant to the light, because the originals of these colours are very fugitive and become brownish at the exposure of the sun and fades to see them disappear in a few years or months ...)

And yet, thanks to cosmetics, there are more red pigments than any other colour pigments… To lose his soul ...

But back to brushes and samples. As for the yellows I made you a chart showing the main characteristic of each red pigment. Yes, there are more, but these non-referenced pigments are rarely used in our watercolour paintings.

Mono Pigment Red Watercolour Comparison Table
Mono Pigment Red Watercolour Comparison Table

To better understand and not to repeat myself, I advise you, if you have problems to analyse the samples, to read the beginning of the article on yellow pigments. All the abbreviations and explanation are there. Use this link to get there.

PR17

Monoazo Naphtol

A bright red, but not very resistant to light. Better to avoid it.

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR17
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR17

PR 63

Monoazo 

Mid shape red. I did not find any indications regarding the light resistance.

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR63
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR63

PR81 & PR81: 1

Phosphotungsto molybdic acid

A bluish red fluorescent bright transparent. Little resistant to light

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR81
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR81

PR83

dihydroxyanthraquinone

Intense dark red with a bluish sub-tone. Fugitive, staining and transparent. The pigment refers to the Madder Lake from which the alizarin crimson is derived. The colour loses a lot of saturation and clears as it dries.

Given the current possibilities to choose a more stable and light-resistant substitute, I do advise you to omit this nuance from your palette.

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR83
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR83

PR101

Synthetic Iron Oxyde

Often classified in earth tones, I classify it in the reds given its international name PR (Pigment Red).

Red ranging from brownish yellow to orange reds with an undertone hue varying from yellow to purple. Depending on the composition and treatments  the watercolours created with this pigment vary from transparent to opaque. (This is also due to the fineness of grinding, the binder, the method of manufacture, impurities and additives).

Paintings made from this pigment and its natural counterpart PR102 exist in almost all shades of yellow, orange, red, purple brown to greenish browns.

It's one of the most light-resistant shades in reds. All PR101 are staining. They lose a lot of saturation during drying.

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR101

PR102

Anhydrous Iron Oxide Natural.

Often classified in earth tones, I classify it in the reds given its international name PR (Pigment Red).

Colour varies from brownish yellow to orange, to reddish tones with a shade of yellow varying to violet.

According to the formulation, this watercolour can vary from transparent to opaque with all the intermediate transparencies.

Like the synthetic PR101, these paints have excellent lightfastness. But unlike the PR101 these colours are not staining.

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR102
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR102

PR107

Red Antimony

Variating from a light orange yellow to a deep carmine.

This red is transparent and of excellent resistance to light.

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR107
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR107

PR108

Cadmium Barium Selenosulphite

Orange-red ranging to deep purplish red. Opaque paint with excellent resistance to light and staining. The drying shift is light to medium and the shades lose between 15% (light shades) and 30% (dark shades) of their saturation. The traditional red used before by watercolour artists, but because of its toxicity is often replaced nowadays by Pyrrole Reds.

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR108
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR108
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR108
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR108

PR112 

Naphthol Red 

The PR122 has a very good lightfastness, transparent and very staining. In an intense orange-red . When drying the saturation loss is about 10% and the overall drying shift is very slight. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR112
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR112

PR122 

Monoazo Red Naphtol 

Intense light yellowish red which becomes more dull and dark when drying. Semi-transparent to semi-opaque, this red has a very good to excellent resistance to light. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR122
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR122
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR122
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR122

PR144 

Condensation of Diazo 

Red of medium shade of very good see excellent resistance to light. Opaque to semi-opaque. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR144
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR144

PR149 

Perylene red 

Intense red with a blue sub-tone, semi-opaque, very good lightfastness and a very strong staining force. Used to replace the Alizarin Crimson who is fugitive (PR83). Becomes darker (sun exposure) when drying, it loses 25% saturation and 15% in tone and turns slightly brown. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR149
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR149

PR168 

Brominated Anthranthron 

Intense yellowish red that becomes darker when drying. Semi-opaque to semi-transparent and staining, this red has a very good to see excellent resistance to light. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR168
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR168

PR170 

Monoazo Arylomide 

Red ranging from dark yellowish red to bluish red. The lightfastness varies from excellent to good according to the brands (to be tested before using), ranging from semi-transparent to opaque. A 20% saturation loss occurs during drying. A light red geranium type for botanical painters or flowers. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR170
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR170

PR176 

Monoazo Benzimidazolone 

Bluish red that tarnishes and becomes more blue as it dries. From a very good to good resistance to light and very staining, this paint is semi-transparent, which makes it a substitute for crimson Alizarin. The paint becomes lighter by 10% and loses 23% of its saturation as it dries. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR176
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR176

PR177 

Anthraquinone 

Deep bluish red. From a very good to medium resistance to light (according to brands, do your tests), this shade is transparent and staining, which makes it a good substitute for Alizarin's chamois, even that the hue is a little different in nuance. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR177
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR177

PR178 

Perylene red 

A deep red that fades a little while drying and has a great staining force. Semi-opaque and excellent in light resistance. Drying results in a loss of almost 20% of saturation and by lightening slightly. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR178
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR178

PR179 

Synthetic Perylene Red 

Deep purplish red fades a little while drying and also loses some vibrancy. Transparent and excellent in light resistance, this paint is very staining. Drying Shift shows a lightening of 17% and a saturation loss of 30%. Without the blue sub-tone of alizarin, this is another approach to replace it. With the PG7 Green Phtalo blue shade, we obtain deep blacks, denser than with the pigments derived from carbon pigments.

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR179
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR179

 PR187 

Monoazo red 

Bright red or deep with a bluish sub-tone. Transparent and very good resistance to light. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR187
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR187

PR188 

Red Naphthol AS GOOD arylamide type Monoazo 

Bright yellowish red that darkens, tarnishes and fades a little while drying. Semi-opaque to semi-transparent, this red has a very good to see excellent resistance to light. The drying shift is slight and there is a loss of 15% saturation. An alternative to cadmium red if we fear their toxicity.

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR188
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR188

 

PR202

Quinacridone 

The quinacridone variant of alizarin crimson. Magenta with a blue sub-tone varying to a medium red. Transparent according to the formulations and marks and excellent resistance to light. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR202
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR202

PR206 

Quinacridone mixed crystal phase 

Dark orange with a brownish purple tone. Transparent and excellent in light resistance, it is a good substitute for Madder lake. In colorimetry, this shade is equivalent to alizarin Crimson but with a more brownish tendency and an orange sub-tone. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR206
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR206

PR207 

Substituted dichloro-quinacridone

A red-yellow that fades. Excellent resistance to light, this paint is semi-transparent to semi-opaque 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR207
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR207

PR 209 

Quinacridone

Quinacridone Rose varying to a medium red. Fades and the colour turns blue when drying. Transparent like most quinacridones, it has excellent lightfastness and is staining. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR209
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR209
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR209
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR209

PR233 

Chromium Silicate Tin 

Light red varying to pink. Semi-opaque and excellent in light resistance.

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR233
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR233

PR242

Vermillion of Disazo

Moderately dark, bright yellow red, which tarnishes a bit and turns blue, losing about 15% saturation when drying. Semi-opaque, very staining and excellent resistance to light. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR242
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR242

PR254 

Pyrrole diketopyrrolo 

Medium red, see darker, shiny that can fade or turn slightly blue when drying. Excellent light fastness, this paint is opaque to semi-opaque 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR254
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR254
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR254
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR254

PR255 

Pyrrole diketopyrrolo

Bright yellow more yellow than PR254. Semi-opaque and of excellent resistance to light. Very staining this paint loses about 15% of its saturation during drying. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR255
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR255
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR255
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR255

PR259 

Sodium polysulfide, potassium, lithium or silver.

From a dark red to a bluish pink. Semi-transparent and excellent in light resistance. 

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR259
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR259

PR264 

Diketo pyrrolo pyrrole 

Deep dark red with a purplish sub-tone. Dulls slightly. Excellent with very good lightfastness and it is semi-transparent, this colour is an excellent replacement for alizarin crimson

Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR264
Watercolour Paint made with Red Pigment PR264

 

Reds without Pigment Information

Reds without any information about pigments used by manufacturer
Reds without any information about pigments used by manufacturer
Reds without any information about pigments used by manufacturer
Reds without any information about pigments used by manufacturer

Discontinued Colors

Red Pigment watercolours discontinued
Red Pigment watercolours discontinued

CONCLUSION 

 

Reds are not often found pure in nature. Great exception are and The flowers that show us a panoply of shades ranging from fragile roses to deep bluish reds. Some days, we can also see in a sunset at sunrise all different shades of this color. For some centuries, the red had the reputation to tarnish or brown over time.

 The extract of the madder root, which provided the chilli for the creation of madder's lacquer and alizarin crimson on employees for the creation of roses and red bluish trend. Even if today, some manufacturers offer us this pigment, better to ignore it because its instability in the light will tarnish your works. 

For a long time red cadmium was the only stable and bright red. The problem of its toxicity and its poor transparency do not make it an ideal shade for watercolor, even taking into account vibrations. Today with the arrival of new pigments, especially Quinacridones, Perylenes and Pyrroles, watercolors have a very wide range is nuanced in terms of the choice of shades of red color.

LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT RED 

The Neutral Red: 

Traditionally, many artists use cadmium red as a neutral red, but this tint tends to be opaque and has some toxicity. As a result, two possibilities are at our disposal with the most recent pigments based on pyrrole, perylene and Quinacridone pigments. Naturally, it is necessary to choose, because the shades are different according to the manufacturers. A notion for the PR255, the red Pyrrole, which despite its semi opacity is closer to a neutral red. Attention, the hue varies according to the manufacturers. 

Neutral Red: Cadmium red was and still is the neutral red used by many artists. But with the arrival of new pigments, less harmful and more transparent, many watercolorists have adopted other nuances. 

 

As a neutral red I advise you to make your choice between; 

* The Pyrrole Red PR255 even if it has according to the brand a tendency to become a little orangeish 

* The Pyrrole Red PR254 a little colder than the PR255 

* Quinacridone Red PR209 which is also the most transparent, but shows a sub-tone of pink 

* The Red of Perylene PR178 neutral but semi-opaque or semi-transparent. 

* Naphtol red transparent but more orange in some manufacturers. 

 

The cold red: 

The reference is Garance Red Lacquer or Alizarin Crimson. These reds are transparent, but they have the big problem of being fugitive and dull to light. Many manufacturers have tried to reproduce these hues as well as Carmine through the use of pigments more resistant to light.

Like cold red, I advise you to make your choice between; 

* The Anthraquinone Red PR177 Transparent variant of neutral bluish to bluish pink 

* Red Monoazo Arylamide PR170 approaching Carmine tint 

* Red Monoazo Benzimidazolone PR176 semi-transparent and approaching the shade of Garance lacquer 

* Red Anthraquinone PR 177 transparent, tinting but quite close to Alizarin Crimson. 

* Synthetic Perylene Red PR179 varying between Garance Brown and Garance Red. 

* Quinacridone Red PR202 rosier than Alizarin Crimson, transparent but tinting. 

* The Red Diketo-Pyrrolo PR264 is the closest shade to semi-transparent or semi-opaque Alizarin Crimson, the shades vary greatly depending on the manufacturer. 

 

Warm Red : 

It is pretty easy to get hot red using magenta and adding a neutral or warm yellow. But there are a lot of yellow pigments that can give a stable base for your mixtures. PY110, PY65 and some variants of PY150 and PY153 may be involved in these mixtures. 

Otherwise, as warm red I advise you to make your choice between; 

* Naphtol Red PR112 Transparent and Tinting (Attention tones vary by manufacturer) 

* Naphtolo AS Red semi-transparent and tinting 

* Vermillion de'Disazo orange red bursting semi-opaque 

* Red Diketopyrrolo PR255 Red glowing slightly yellowish semi opaque 

 

You have to make your choice, because to choose a color, you have to analyze its style and preferences. I can not guide you in this choice, which is the most personal and specific to your intuition and feelings

 

Last tip ... Never mix 2 opaque colors as the result will be quite disappointing and soulless. 

 

In a few weeks I will publish my article about blue pigments. It will be faster than the red ones because the blue pigments there are less blue pigments than red and yellow ones !

Commenter cet article

MissMagic 31/07/2018 02:53

St Petersburg/White Nights colour Carmine is made with PR 170:1 not PR107:1, I think someone somewhere made a typo, possibly on a site that you referred to? It's a beautiful colour, I have it myself.
MM

Désiré Herman 31/07/2018 15:23

Actually, White Nights doesn't produce this Color anymore. They have a Carmine Hue with PR187. I got the information from the pan itself. It's not the first time that a manufacturer noted an error on their labels. I've got the issue with Schmincke also (Yellow).On Laura Blundell's blog the Carmine Hue is indicated being 170:1 and Ruby is PR170. I come back if I've more information about the real Carmine and not the Carmine Hue.
Thanks for letting me know.

abdulmuiz 12/06/2018 15:54

hi there...thank you for the information...

I'd love to read the article on blues.....i have 5 blues out of 20 colors in my palette....one of them is manganese blue....

see ya

Désiré Herman 13/06/2018 06:09

Yes, I did all the primaries now. Way to go as I've all secondaries to comment and also neutrals and earth tones and special pigments. But actually, I'm very busy doing 30 different triads in the #30x30DirectWatercolor2018 with a painting a day for all the days of the month of June.

CM 26/04/2018 08:00

You have spent a huge amount of time putting together this fabulous collection of info! I'm amazed, fascinated, in love! But just an fyi, you did make an error that could be confusing to future viewers. Under Anthraquinone PR177 you have DS labeled as the popular Quin Red, which is in fact PR19. I only noticed that because I was interested in your comments on the blue-reds and have been trying to distinguish how specifically those two mix differently with blues to create delicious blacks, of course without purchasing the PR177 before knowing that info. Excellent info here! I'm now addicted to your blog!

Désiré Herman 26/04/2018 08:24

Quin Red by D.S. is made with PV19, not PR19, just for information. It's a violet pigment and will be shown in the violet article.

Désiré Herman 26/04/2018 08:22

Sorry, I made a mistake while labeling this color. In the PR177 you have to read Anthraquinone Red and not Quinacridone Red (both Daniel Smith). I'll try to update this ... Quinacridone Red by Daniel Smith will be commented and the swatch will be shown in the PV - Violet section, that I'll post after the blues and oranges. Mixing blacks, greys, and neutrals will be handled in the last article.
By the way, when I will have commented and published the articles about the 3 primaries, the secondaries will also have a chapter how to mix these from primary colors.
Thank you for your interest and have a painterly day.